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We. Are. Supernatural.

It has been said that we all have angels assigned to us or all around us.

If that is true, mine sent me to the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa last weekend.

I was chosen, along with 14 other women across the country to participate in a three-day workshop called The Storyteller Project: Digital Storytelling for Women of Color facilitated by Dr. Robin Boylorn and Veralyn Williams with a special lunch and learn with Dr. Rachel Raimist.

When I was selected, I remember feeling so much excitement that I paced the room. I didn’t even think about what it would be or what I would be in that space until I got the additional information we needed to prepare before coming–“Bring an excerpt written by/about a woman of color that inspires or resonates with you (one paragraph or less). Personal story ideas or topics (Consider what part of your story do you want to tell, and why?)”

That part of the preparation made it real.  I was going to come and fellowship, yes. But I was going to have to do the work. Ask myself serious questions. It demanded that one of my truths be spoken.

As time passed and the workshop was rescheduled from August to October, I had time to let a few doubts seep in about whether or not my story would be compelling or impactful enough but I never let it take up residence in my mind, the only place that matters.

Within seconds of  arriving in The Hub at the University of Alabama, any fears I had were allayed. I was met with such warmth by the other women, Dr. Robin Boylorn and her graduate assistant, Lola I was instantly at ease. I no longer doubted the validity or the strength of my story. There was no reason to wonder why I had been chosen.

There was no time for my “stuff.”

I was there not only to be a participant and a storyteller but to bear witness.

I witnessed Black women being daughters, Black women being mothers and Black women being sisters.

Black women giving ourselves permission to fall apart recognizing there was someone there to provide a soft place, lap and heart.

I witnessed women give birth to their stories.

It was painstaking at times but it was healing.

There were women aching to release their screams, aching for the women who raised them, aching to claim their sexuality, aching for healing, aching to tell stories of other silenced and forgotten Black men and women, aching to be seen and aching for a way to grieve.

There were moments where my heart was so full “overflow” will never be the word, is not enough of a word.

On Day 1, we were asked to work in groups to talk about Black women, our stories and address the themes of the passages we brought.

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By Day 3, it was evident they weren’t just words in marker on paper taped to a wall. We gave those words life. We breathed life into those words. We embodied those themes and stories in our work.

I was in a room full of survivors.

 

 

On Day 2, Dr. Rachel Raimist joined the party via Zoom in Los Angeles. She imparted valuable advice on how to break down our audio to prepare them for Day 3. During the session, she used a photo of her own grandmother and mother to propose a story. I loved how she used something as simple as the frame (or lack thereof) to give us ideas on the many ways to approach a narrative.

Veralyn Williams (NPR producer with the patience of an angel) came from New York to start co-facilitating with Robin and help us produce our audio/audio-visual stories. In addition to sharing her digital storytelling expertise, she challenged me. I had never used the IMovie application before and I was frustrated trying to navigate it. After helping me with some of the more difficult parts of the editing process, she let me know in no uncertain times she was not going to complete it for me.

Even though I didn’t ask her to, she knew if I sat back and let her continue to work on the visuals, I would have. It became glaringly obvious how uncomfortable I am with people recognizing my fear of not being able to do something well.

I psyched myself up to finish, remembering we were all in this together and as Robin lovingly pointed out, this was technically a first draft.

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Dr. Rachel Raimist joining us during our Lunch and Learn session on Day 2 from LA.

After dinner and pictures we all sat together (including Robin’s beautiful mother) to screen our stories and enjoy cake.

 

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I know I can only speak for myself but what I experienced during and especially after the screening was no less than supernatural.

When a group of Black  women who don’t hold shame and celebrate the skin they’re in congregate and create with love, there is a sense of power, a collective power in the room.

We. Are. Supernatural.

Fallible, awkward, soft, strong, honorable, brash, intelligent, sexy, artistic, quiet, curious, unapologetically ambitious, feminine, nerdy, funny as hell but supernatural nonetheless.

Right before coming, I was in the middle of a serious healing journey with my husband and I considered not coming.

I made the right choice.

I chose my voice and I chose to welcome new ones into my life.

Thank you Robin (and your dear mother), Veralyn, Rachel, Lola, Andrea, Salaam, Jameka, Allison, Tiffany, Cassandra, Bernadette, Jilisa, Nadia, Tracy, Delilah and Lakeesha.

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “We. Are. Supernatural.

  1. Seemed like an awesome time with equally awesome women! ! .

    1. It was. Thank you!

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